Buy Bitcoin in the UK: 25+ best exchanges (2020 update ...

trade gold with bitcoin and dash online

Vaultoro.com is an online trading platform based in the UK that lets it's users trade bitcoin and physical good delivery gold. Vaultoro is provably at above reserve and prides it's self on security, customer service and transparency. Low trading fees and able to trade gold in 0.1 gram increments.
[link]

Kraken Exchange

A place to discuss the Kraken Digital Assets Exchange
[link]

A new (June 2020) bitcoin exchange-traded commodity and the first one I can buy in my (UK) broker platform. Don't know why I hadn't heard of it already seems kind of a big deal.

A new (June 2020) bitcoin exchange-traded commodity and the first one I can buy in my (UK) broker platform. Don't know why I hadn't heard of it already seems kind of a big deal. submitted by jaydoors to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Are there any truly reliable bitcoin trading platforms in the UK?

I'm currently using Coinbase as I am a noob (sorry). I'm looking to invest in a couple of the other bigger cryptos and some alt coins but i can't seem to find any trading platforms that are reliable. Every platform I have found, Bitstamp, Kraken etc. have a bunch of horror stories when it comes to actually withdrawing money from them. I did try Coinfloor however for some unknown reason they just said they couldn't offer me an account for some reason. no explanation. Just binned me off during the registration process.
I'd really like to know what platforms people in the UK are using and how easily they are able to withdraw money from these platforms. I'd like to go balls deep into crypto over the next few months but I'm hesitant to if I wont ever be able to make withdrawals.
Thanks in advance
submitted by de86 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives submitted by fallenkeith1990 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives submitted by leftok to atbitcoin [link] [comments]

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives submitted by prnewswireadmin to cryptonewswire [link] [comments]

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives /r/Bitcoincash

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives /Bitcoincash submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives - Crypto Exchange Huobi Announces Five Partnerships To Further Its Expansion Efforts - Coinbase Files Patent To Make Direct Bitcoin Payments More Secure

submitted by cryptocompare to cryptocompare [link] [comments]

UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives (current BTC/USD price is $6511.4697465)

Latest Bitcoin News:
UK Trading Platform Crypto Facilities Launches Bitcoin Cash Derivatives
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Blockchain | ICOs
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools. Follow us on Twitter @CoinSalad.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

Ethereum Futures Go Live on UK Trading Platform - HSBC Holdings Completes First Blockchain Trade Deal - BitGo Courts Wall Street With New Bitcoin Custody Products

submitted by cryptocompare to cryptocompare [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Ethereum Futures Go Live on UK Trading Platform /r/ethtrader

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Ethereum Futures Go Live on UK Trading Platform /ethtrader submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Best UK Bitcoin "Trading" Platform

What would you advise as the best Bitcoin trading platforms in the UK as opposed to buying it? I have been finding it difficult to find many good options. I found one but the fees for transfers of GBP in and out were scandalous. Cheers!
submitted by johnmknox to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Are there any truly reliable bitcoin trading platforms in the UK?

The following post by de86 is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7jdyvh
The original post's content was as follows:
I'm currently using Coinbase as I am a noob (sorry). I'm looking to invest in a couple of the other bigger cryptos and some alt coins but i can't seem to find any trading platforms that are reliable. Every platform I have found, Bitstamp, Kraken etc. have a bunch of horror stories when it comes to actually withdrawing money from them. I did try Coinfloor however for some unknown reason they just said they couldn't offer me an account for some reason. no explanation. Just binned me off during the registration process.
I'd really like to know what platforms people in the UK are using and how easily they are able to withdraw money from these platforms. I'd like to go balls deep into crypto over the next few months but I'm hesitant to if I wont ever be able to make withdrawals.
Thanks in advance
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Are there any truly reliable bitcoin trading platforms in the UK? /r/Bitcoin

Are there any truly reliable bitcoin trading platforms in the UK? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

12-01 20:42 - 'UK's Royal Mint, CME Group launch blockchain-based gold trading platform' (cdn.ampproject.org) by /u/nomadismydj removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3280-3285min

UK's Royal Mint, CME Group launch blockchain-based gold trading platform
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: nomadismydj
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Ultimate glossary of crypto currency terms, acronyms and abbreviations

I thought it would be really cool to have an ultimate guide for those new to crypto currencies and the terms used. I made this mostly for beginner’s and veterans alike. I’m not sure how much use you will get out of this. Stuff gets lost on Reddit quite easily so I hope this finds its way to you. Included in this list, I have included most of the terms used in crypto-communities. I have compiled this list from a multitude of sources. The list is in alphabetical order and may include some words/terms not exclusive to the crypto world but may be helpful regardless.
2FA
Two factor authentication. I highly advise that you use it.
51% Attack:
A situation where a single malicious individual or group gains control of more than half of a cryptocurrency network’s computing power. Theoretically, it could allow perpetrators to manipulate the system and spend the same coin multiple times, stop other users from completing blocks and make conflicting transactions to a chain that could harm the network.
Address (or Addy):
A unique string of numbers and letters (both upper and lower case) used to send, receive or store cryptocurrency on the network. It is also the public key in a pair of keys needed to sign a digital transaction. Addresses can be shared publicly as a text or in the form of a scannable QR code. They differ between cryptocurrencies. You can’t send Bitcoin to an Ethereum address, for example.
Altcoin (alternative coin): Any digital currency other than Bitcoin. These other currencies are alternatives to Bitcoin regarding features and functionalities (e.g. faster confirmation time, lower price, improved mining algorithm, higher total coin supply). There are hundreds of altcoins, including Ether, Ripple, Litecoin and many many others.
AIRDROP:
An event where the investors/participants are able to receive free tokens or coins into their digital wallet.
AML: Defines Anti-Money Laundering laws**.**
ARBITRAGE:
Getting risk-free profits by trading (simultaneous buying and selling of the cryptocurrency) on two different exchanges which have different prices for the same asset.
Ashdraked:
Being Ashdraked is essentially a more detailed version of being Zhoutonged. It is when you lose all of your invested capital, but you do so specifically by shorting Bitcoin. The expression “Ashdraked” comes from a story of a Romanian cryptocurrency investor who insisted upon shorting BTC, as he had done so successfully in the past. When the price of BTC rose from USD 300 to USD 500, the Romanian investor lost all of his money.
ATH (All Time High):
The highest price ever achieved by a cryptocurrency in its entire history. Alternatively, ATL is all time low
Bearish:
A tendency of prices to fall; a pessimistic expectation that the value of a coin is going to drop.
Bear trap:
A manipulation of a stock or commodity by investors.
Bitcoin:
The very first, and the highest ever valued, mass-market open source and decentralized cryptocurrency and digital payment system that runs on a worldwide peer to peer network. It operates independently of any centralized authorities
Bitconnect:
One of the biggest scams in the crypto world. it was made popular in the meme world by screaming idiot Carlos Matos, who infamously proclaimed," hey hey heeeey” and “what's a what's a what's up wasssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuup, BitConneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeect!”. He is now in the mentally ill meme hall of fame.
Block:
A package of permanently recorded data about transactions occurring every time period (typically about 10 minutes) on the blockchain network. Once a record has been completed and verified, it goes into a blockchain and gives way to the next block. Each block also contains a complex mathematical puzzle with a unique answer, without which new blocks can’t be added to the chain.
Blockchain:
An unchangeable digital record of all transactions ever made in a particular cryptocurrency and shared across thousands of computers worldwide. It has no central authority governing it. Records, or blocks, are chained to each other using a cryptographic signature. They are stored publicly and chronologically, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the term blockchain. Anyone can have access to the database and yet it remains incredibly difficult to hack.
Bullish:
A tendency of prices to rise; an optimistic expectation that a specific cryptocurrency will do well and its value is going to increase.
BTFD:
Buy the fucking dip. This advise was bestowed upon us by the gods themselves. It is the iron code to crypto enthusiasts.
Bull market:
A market that Cryptos are going up.
Consensus:
An agreement among blockchain participants on the validity of data. Consensus is reached when the majority of nodes on the network verify that the transaction is 100% valid.
Crypto bubble:
The instability of cryptocurrencies in terms of price value
Cryptocurrency:
A type of digital currency, secured by strong computer code (cryptography), that operates independently of any middlemen or central authoritie
Cryptography:
The art of converting sensitive data into a format unreadable for unauthorized users, which when decoded would result in a meaningful statement.
Cryptojacking:
The use of someone else’s device and profiting from its computational power to mine cryptocurrency without their knowledge and consent.
Crypto-Valhalla:
When HODLers(holders) eventually cash out they go to a place called crypto-Valhalla. The strong will be separated from the weak and the strong will then be given lambos.
DAO:
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations. It defines A blockchain technology inspired organization or corporation that exists and operates without human intervention.
Dapp (decentralized application):
An open-source application that runs and stores its data on a blockchain network (instead of a central server) to prevent a single failure point. This software is not controlled by the single body – information comes from people providing other people with data or computing power.
Decentralized:
A system with no fundamental control authority that governs the network. Instead, it is jointly managed by all users to the system.
Desktop wallet:
A wallet that stores the private keys on your computer, which allow the spending and management of your bitcoins.
DILDO:
Long red or green candles. This is a crypto signal that tells you that it is not favorable to trade at the moment. Found on candlestick charts.
Digital Signature:
An encrypted digital code attached to an electronic document to prove that the sender is who they say they are and confirm that a transaction is valid and should be accepted by the network.
Double Spending:
An attack on the blockchain where a malicious user manipulates the network by sending digital money to two different recipients at exactly the same time.
DYOR:
Means do your own research.
Encryption:
Converting data into code to protect it from unauthorized access, so that only the intended recipient(s) can decode it.
Eskrow:
the practice of having a third party act as an intermediary in a transaction. This third party holds the funds on and sends them off when the transaction is completed.
Ethereum:
Ethereum is an open source, public, blockchain-based platform that runs smart contracts and allows you to build dapps on it. Ethereum is fueled by the cryptocurrency Ether.
Exchange:
A platform (centralized or decentralized) for exchanging (trading) different forms of cryptocurrencies. These exchanges allow you to exchange cryptos for local currency. Some popular exchanges are Coinbase, Bittrex, Kraken and more.
Faucet:
A website which gives away free cryptocurrencies.
Fiat money:
Fiat currency is legal tender whose value is backed by the government that issued it, such as the US dollar or UK pound.
Fork:
A split in the blockchain, resulting in two separate branches, an original and a new alternate version of the cryptocurrency. As a single blockchain forks into two, they will both run simultaneously on different parts of the network. For example, Bitcoin Cash is a Bitcoin fork.
FOMO:
Fear of missing out.
Frictionless:
A system is frictionless when there are zero transaction costs or trading retraints.
FUD:
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt regarding the crypto market.
Gas:
A fee paid to run transactions, dapps and smart contracts on Ethereum.
Halving:
A 50% decrease in block reward after the mining of a pre-specified number of blocks. Every 4 years, the “reward” for successfully mining a block of bitcoin is reduced by half. This is referred to as “Halving”.
Hardware wallet:
Physical wallet devices that can securely store cryptocurrency maximally. Some examples are Ledger Nano S**,** Digital Bitbox and more**.**
Hash:
The process that takes input data of varying sizes, performs an operation on it and converts it into a fixed size output. It cannot be reversed.
Hashing:
The process by which you mine bitcoin or similar cryptocurrency, by trying to solve the mathematical problem within it, using cryptographic hash functions.
HODL:
A Bitcoin enthusiast once accidentally misspelled the word HOLD and it is now part of the bitcoin legend. It can also mean hold on for dear life.
ICO (Initial Coin Offering):
A blockchain-based fundraising mechanism, or a public crowd sale of a new digital coin, used to raise capital from supporters for an early stage crypto venture. Beware of these as there have been quite a few scams in the past.
John mcAfee:
A man who will one day eat his balls on live television for falsely predicting bitcoin going to 100k. He has also become a small meme within the crypto community for his outlandish claims.
JOMO:
Joy of missing out. For those who are so depressed about missing out their sadness becomes joy.
KYC:
Know your customer(alternatively consumer).
Lambo:
This stands for Lamborghini. A small meme within the investing community where the moment someone gets rich they spend their earnings on a lambo. One day we will all have lambos in crypto-valhalla.
Ledger:
Away from Blockchain, it is a book of financial transactions and balances. In the world of crypto, the blockchain functions as a ledger. A digital currency’s ledger records all transactions which took place on a certain block chain network.
Leverage:
Trading with borrowed capital (margin) in order to increase the potential return of an investment.
Liquidity:
The availability of an asset to be bought and sold easily, without affecting its market price.
of the coins.
Margin trading:
The trading of assets or securities bought with borrowed money.
Market cap/MCAP:
A short-term for Market Capitalization. Market Capitalization refers to the market value of a particular cryptocurrency. It is computed by multiplying the Price of an individual unit of coins by the total circulating supply.
Miner:
A computer participating in any cryptocurrency network performing proof of work. This is usually done to receive block rewards.
Mining:
The act of solving a complex math equation to validate a blockchain transaction using computer processing power and specialized hardware.
Mining contract:
A method of investing in bitcoin mining hardware, allowing anyone to rent out a pre-specified amount of hashing power, for an agreed amount of time. The mining service takes care of hardware maintenance, hosting and electricity costs, making it simpler for investors.
Mining rig:
A computer specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies.
Mooning:
A situation the price of a coin rapidly increases in value. Can also be used as: “I hope bitcoin goes to the moon”
Node:
Any computing device that connects to the blockchain network.
Open source:
The practice of sharing the source code for a piece of computer software, allowing it to be distributed and altered by anyone.
OTC:
Over the counter. Trading is done directly between parties.
P2P (Peer to Peer):
A type of network connection where participants interact directly with each other rather than through a centralized third party. The system allows the exchange of resources from A to B, without having to go through a separate server.
Paper wallet:
A form of “cold storage” where the private keys are printed onto a piece of paper and stored offline. Considered as one of the safest crypto wallets, the truth is that it majors in sweeping coins from your wallets.
Pre mining:
The mining of a cryptocurrency by its developers before it is released to the public.
Proof of stake (POS):
A consensus distribution algorithm which essentially rewards you based upon the amount of the coin that you own. In other words, more investment in the coin will leads to more gain when you mine with this protocol In Proof of Stake, the resource held by the “miner” is their stake in the currency.
PROOF OF WORK (POW) :
The competition of computers competing to solve a tough crypto math problem. The first computer that does this is allowed to create new blocks and record information.” The miner is then usually rewarded via transaction fees.
Protocol:
A standardized set of rules for formatting and processing data.
Public key / private key:
A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into an account. The public key is made available to everyone via a publicly accessible directory, and the private key remains confidential to its respective owner. Because the key pair is mathematically related, whatever is encrypted with a public key may only be decrypted by its corresponding private key.
Pump and dump:
Massive buying and selling activity of cryptocurrencies (sometimes organized and to one’s benefit) which essentially result in a phenomenon where the significant surge in the value of coin followed by a huge crash take place in a short time frame.
Recovery phrase:
A set of phrases you are given whereby you can regain or access your wallet should you lose the private key to your wallets — paper, mobile, desktop, and hardware wallet. These phrases are some random 12–24 words. A recovery Phrase can also be called as Recovery seed, Seed Key, Recovery Key, or Seed Phrase.
REKT:
Referring to the word “wrecked”. It defines a situation whereby an investor or trader who has been ruined utterly following the massive losses suffered in crypto industry.
Ripple:
An alternative payment network to Bitcoin based on similar cryptography. The ripple network uses XRP as currency and is capable of sending any asset type.
ROI:
Return on investment.
Safu:
A crypto term for safe popularized by the Bizonnaci YouTube channel after the CEO of Binance tweeted
“Funds are safe."
“the exchage I use got hacked!”“Oh no, are your funds safu?”
“My coins better be safu!”


Sats/Satoshi:
The smallest fraction of a bitcoin is called a “satoshi” or “sat”. It represents one hundred-millionth of a bitcoin and is named after Satoshi Nakamoto.
Satoshi Nakamoto:
This was the pseudonym for the mysterious creator of Bitcoin.
Scalability:
The ability of a cryptocurrency to contain the massive use of its Blockchain.
Sharding:
A scaling solution for the Blockchain. It is generally a method that allows nodes to have partial copies of the complete blockchain in order to increase overall network performance and consensus speeds.
Shitcoin:
Coin with little potential or future prospects.
Shill:
Spreading buzz by heavily promoting a particular coin in the community to create awareness.
Short position:
Selling of a specific cryptocurrency with an expectation that it will drop in value.
Silk road:
The online marketplace where drugs and other illicit items were traded for Bitcoin. This marketplace is using accessed through “TOR”, and VPNs. In October 2013, a Silk Road was shut down in by the FBI.
Smart Contract:
Certain computational benchmarks or barriers that have to be met in turn for money or data to be deposited or even be used to verify things such as land rights.
Software Wallet:
A crypto wallet that exists purely as software files on a computer. Usually, software wallets can be generated for free from a variety of sources.
Solidity:
A contract-oriented coding language for implementing smart contracts on Ethereum. Its syntax is similar to that of JavaScript.
Stable coin:
A cryptocoin with an extremely low volatility that can be used to trade against the overall market.
Staking:
Staking is the process of actively participating in transaction validation (similar to mining) on a proof-of-stake (PoS) blockchain. On these blockchains, anyone with a minimum-required balance of a specific cryptocurrency can validate transactions and earn Staking rewards.
Surge:
When a crypto currency appreciates or goes up in price.
Tank:
The opposite of mooning. When a coin tanks it can also be described as crashing.
Tendies
For traders , the chief prize is “tendies” (chicken tenders, the treat an overgrown man-child receives for being a “Good Boy”) .
Token:
A unit of value that represents a digital asset built on a blockchain system. A token is usually considered as a “coin” of a cryptocurrency, but it really has a wider functionality.
TOR: “The Onion Router” is a free web browser designed to protect users’ anonymity and resist censorship. Tor is usually used surfing the web anonymously and access sites on the “Darkweb”.
Transaction fee:
An amount of money users are charged from their transaction when sending cryptocurrencies.
Volatility:
A measure of fluctuations in the price of a financial instrument over time. High volatility in bitcoin is seen as risky since its shifting value discourages people from spending or accepting it.
Wallet:
A file that stores all your private keys and communicates with the blockchain to perform transactions. It allows you to send and receive bitcoins securely as well as view your balance and transaction history.
Whale:
An investor that holds a tremendous amount of cryptocurrency. Their extraordinary large holdings allow them to control prices and manipulate the market.
Whitepaper:

A comprehensive report or guide made to understand an issue or help decision making. It is also seen as a technical write up that most cryptocurrencies provide to take a deep look into the structure and plan of the cryptocurrency/Blockchain project. Satoshi Nakamoto was the first to release a whitepaper on Bitcoin, titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” in late 2008.
And with that I finally complete my odyssey. I sincerely hope that this helped you and if you are new, I welcome you to crypto. If you read all of that I hope it increased, you in knowledge.
my final definition:
Crypto-Family:
A collection of all the HODLers and crypto fanatics. A place where all people alike unite over a love for crypto.
We are all in this together as we pioneer the new world that is crypto currency. I wish you a great day and Happy HODLing.
-u/flacciduck
feel free to comment words or terms that you feel should be included or about any errors I made.
Edit1:some fixes were made and added words.
submitted by flacciduck to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The FCA bans on Bitcoin and other crypto assets are too harsh and hypocritical.

I as a British citizen and Im concerned about the recent Bitcoin ban.
Reasons why:
  1. You can be scammed out on Forex trading due to high leverage, online con artists and platforms shutting down forex trading altogether.
Plus 500 stopped trading the USA/CNH trading pair after the trade war was declared by trump.
  1. Gambling has no regulations, I can spend as much money as possible on any game or sport and no questions are asked.
A uni student committed suicide last year after being groomed by gambling companies to spend over 20k in one week. No action was taken.
  1. Platforms such as plus 500 offer options that have high spreads, hidden leverage, doesn't track the asset price and can be shut down and can be manupliated by the platform at will.
Plus 500 regulary increase the spread of options such as gold, oil, stocks during trading days and also shut down trading on a daily basis.
Plus 500 shut down Natural gas options for 12hrs due to a 6% slump.
  1. The UK is one of the biggest money laundering and predatory finance trading countries in the world.
The requirements to be a pro trader are insane: ( you need 2/3)
  1. you need experience working in finance.
  2. 500k trading captail
  3. Or make 12+ large trades in the past year.
Ironically using Binance and Coinbase for trading has been safer for me compared to uk stock/forex trading apps.
In summary the reasons above HAPPEN ALL THE TIME AND NOTHING IS BEING DONE TO STOP THESE THINGS FROM HAPPENING.
But Bitcoin and cryptocurrencey as a whole are seen as evil even though they have been profitable for the majority of their existence.
submitted by Vegas-Ranger to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Don't really know what to do with my money

Hi everyone!
Long time lurker, first-time poster (also, new account!)
I'm from a European country and I'm struggling to navigate through the UK financial system (I've already followed the flowchart, hence the savings). As the title says, I really do not know what to do with my money so I'll guess it'll be better to give a bit of background.
I'm 32, finished university just two years ago and I'm currently on a 55K yearly salary. Take-home pay is a bit over £3K monthly. I already maxed out the pension contributions (5%). Apart from salary, I've got £10K savings sitting in an HSBC Advance account and around £2500 in between Bitcoin and Litecoin.
No short term debt, but I have a student loan sitting at £51K at the moment, for which I pay almost £200 monthly.
My current expenses are £850 a month for rent (room in central London, crazy prices). I'm planning to spend around £650 extra for food, gym, going out and eating out, which leaves me with around £1500 per month and I don't really know what can I do with it.
It would be nice to save for a house deposit, however, after looking at services like the LISA, I'm not ready to commit to it as I don't even know if I plan to live in the UK for the rest of my life, or if I will ever be able to afford a mortgage in London. That said, I don't mind putting the money somewhere for a few years.
I have been looking at different ISA's, saving accounts, and trading platforms such as 212, but I am completely lost about what to do. I've also been thinking whether it'll be wise to start paying more towards the student loan, as I can see myself potentially paying it off before the 30 years.
If anyone has any suggestions it'll be greatly appreciated!
submitted by MrKhinkali to UKPersonalFinance [link] [comments]

Help!! I got scammed by a Bitcoin company

I was looking into a trading platform called AlpinumCG. I signed up through Bitcoin Revolution and immediately after signing up, I received an email and a phone call from the UK. The lady on the phone told me to click the link on the email where it would lead me to put in my personal information (name, address) and my credit card information because I needed an initial 250 USD in order to open my account and start trading. I was sceptical at first but she reassured me and was rushing me into it because she said there was a “promotion” going on. My stupid self put my credit card information and it automatically charged my card. After that, she hung up not telling me what to expect.
I get another email a couple hours later with login details to my trading account with AlpinumCG. Right when I logged into AlpinumCG, I get another phone call from a financial advisor from AlpinumCG and he told me the basics of the trading platform.
I checked it out and saw that my funds were increasing and I thought it was working. But I went online to see reviews about this company and many people were saying it was a scam. I called them back and asked for a refund/withdrawal as well as to close my account and they said the financial team would call me back and do it for me.
However a couple days passed and they never got back to me. So I tried to withdraw my deposit but it wouldn’t let me. I called and emailed them multiple times with no response. I realize they just took my money and completely cut all communications with me. I even tried closing the account but it wouldn’t let me do so because only the company had control over that. I’m planning to contact my bank to file a dispute and a chargeback as well as change my credit card but I’m scared that I can’t close my account and they will charge me fees (like tax or hidden fees) as the funds keep increasing (even though I can’t even withdraw it) or mail a bill to my house because they have my address.
Please help! I don’t know what to do and I’m scared this will come back in the future to bite me.
submitted by ohbaiko to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What's the best way to shut down an obvious Bitcoin scam (hosted in UK and reached to me via Insta)

What's the best way to shut down an obvious Bitcoin scam (hosted in UK and reached to me via Insta)
I’m sorry, but people like this ruin the image for the community and make it difficult for legitimate trading platforms to gain approval. No to mention - could be straight up stealing as well. A stranger contacted me on Insta asking me to transfer bitcoin to this website (https://fxcryptobinarytrade.co.uk )
Even when I mentioned I was uneasy with this, this is what he responded with this (chats are below). Think about it - He must be sending the same message to those actually vulnerable (eg. seniors). My life dream has always been to end up on prorevenge. How do I f*** his sh*t up.

Was curious about his operations

After I told him, I can easily mine BTC on my own.
submitted by summerwindFS to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

Is this guy trying to scam me? Should I report him?

This morning, I had a guy (UK) reach out to me (USA) on Instagram. No mutuals, no reason us to be connected. After a few short messages, here's what he sent to me:
"I'm (name) and I work with a financial growth institute on Forex, I'm a professional Forex trader with 11 years experience where I'm able to achieve success where others find it difficult. ForexTrade is the fastest growing and easiest growing online trade very beneficial to everyone interested. It is trade made on Gold, Bitcoin, currencies, as well as cryptocurrencies (digital currency) and the stocks when there would be a rose or fall and it would be safe to buy or sell. You don't need any skill to do it because we are professional traders and account managers and study the stocks market and know when it's safe to sell or buy when favourable to your gain.
Forex trading is one of the highest paid investment treasury in the world, it is a lucrative platform worth trillions of dollars and you can earn tremendous profits with good experience in Forex trading. Here you can make twice your investment, no experience needed. Let's say I start trading on Forex with $5000, I'm sure to get a profit of $15000 at the end of every week or 21 days at most."
Me: "Cool, what's your role?"
Him: "I offer trading account management services with tutoring where you'll be able to watch your forex live trading account progression with each day I manage and trade your account. I charge a 20% commission of the total profits I make trading on your Forex live account.
I googled "Forex scam" and couldn't find too much online. I'm really suspicious for a few reasons:
  1. A lot of what he says seems like stringing along buzzwords in an effort to wow me. "Bitcoin... as well as cryptocurrencies" But bitcoin IS a cyrptocurrency...? Also what even is a financial growth institute?
  2. Why can't I find him on LinkedIn? That seems like an obvious place to be if you're trying to expand your network (and a whole lot more reasonable than Instagram)
  3. If we "don't need any skill to do it", why do I need to pay him 20% commission? Surely I could find someone else who will do it for less or do it myself?
  4. His Instagram says he has 8000 followers, following 7000 people. But his first post is from *3 days ago* and none of them has more than 80 likes. To me, it looks like he's bought most of his followers. Also just looking through a few of their profiles, none of them appear to be British.
  5. He seems very certain of his ability to succeed. That certainty seems misplaced for a few reasons.
  6. He has no reason to reach out to me. When I accepted his message request, I thought he had found me on Tinder or something. But no, he just saw that I'm military and I'd liked some pictures on a military page (which FUCK THIS GUY WITH A SPATULA if he's trying to scam fellow service members out of money).
So anyway. If this is a scam (which I am leaning toward yes), my follow-up would be:
  1. Can I report him to Instagram? Will anything be done?
  2. What else could I do? If he's actively targeting the military, I want to bring this guy down.
submitted by TheStairsGoUp to NoStupidQuestions [link] [comments]

$400 in Free Cash/Bitcoin plus up to 22% Interest Annually on Crypto - Sign Up for BlockFi, Crypto.com, Celsius Network, Voyager, Gemini, Liquid, Coinbase, Crypterium - Crypto Exchange & Wallet Apps

$400 in Free Cash/Bitcoin plus up to 22% Interest Annually on Crypto - Sign Up for BlockFi, Crypto.com, Celsius Network, Voyager, Gemini, Liquid, Coinbase, Crypterium - Crypto Exchange & Wallet Apps
Here's a great list of promo codes, referrals, and bonuses to get into cryptocurrency or accumulate more with a minimum of $200 (up to $400) in free cash/Bitcoin bonuses from Voyager ($25 Bitcoin), BlockFi ($10 Bitcoin), Celsius Network ($120 Bitcoin), Crypto.com ($50 Cash), Gemini ($10 Bitcoin), Coinbase ($10 Bitcoin + $171 Bonus), and Crypterium ($5 Cash) by signing up and making a small deposits/transactions! All companies are regulated and licensed in the US and globally.
Crypto.com, Celsius Network, BlockFi, Gemini, Liquid, Coinbase, and Crypterium are open to users globally, but Voyager is for US customers only. All bonuses post immediately after you make a deposit or buy crypto which you can sell and cash out to your bank.
In addition, you'll earn up to 22% APY interest annually on your crypto you hold and deposit into your accounts at Voyager (up to 9%), BlockFi (up to 8.6%), Celsius Network (up to 22%) and Crypto.com (up to 12%) on Bitcoin, Ethereum, USD stablecoins, and others.
More details below! Be sure to use each link or code to get every bonus and thank you!

Crypto.com ($50 Cash Bonus + Up to 12% APY Interest)

Get $50 free cash bonus when you signup and open a Crypto.com account (https://platinum.crypto.com/bcsbb2r465) or use referral code bcsbb2r465 during registration by 31 October 2020. After you buy and hold 1000 CRO (Crypto.com) tokens, the $50 cash bonus is unlocked to your wallet to spend with your free MCO Visa prepaid card which earns up to 5% cashback on all purchases with free Netflix, Spotify and Amazon Prime membership! This offer is available to all users globally! You must sign up by 31 October 2020 to get the $50 cash bonus!
Crypto.com is the best place to buy and sell cryptocurrency with fees as low as 0.10%. Plus you'll earn up to 8% interest per year on the cryptos you deposit into your Crypto.com account like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Binance Coin, and PAX Gold. You'll earn up to 12% interest per year on stablecoin deposits like USDT, USDC, DAI, PAX, GUSD and TGBP. Interest is paid weekly!
You can buy 1000 MCO (Crypto.com) tokens via the Crypto.com app with bank transfer, credit card or crypto like Bitcoin. 1000 CRO will cost between $140 to $180 depending on the price of CRO tokens. The 1000 CRO tokens will be locked up for 6 months.
Visit https://platinum.crypto.com/bcsbb2r465 or download the Crypto.com app for iOS or Android and use my referral code bcsbb2r465 during registration to get your instant $50 cash bonus. You must register by 31 October 2020 to get the $50 bonus! Starting 1 November 2020, the bonus is reduced to $25!

Voyager ($25 in Free Bitcoin + Up to 9% APY Interest)

Get $25 in free Bitcoin (BTC) when you download and signup for the Voyager Crypto Trading App with code O6E5JJ and trade at least $100 or more in crypto (buy and/or sell). Available only to US residents.
To get your $25 in free Bitcoin after trading (buy/sell) $100 or more in crypto, use reward/referral code O6E5JJ during registration:
Voyager App allows you to connect a bank account and deposit cash directly. The easiest way to get the bonus is depositing at least $100 into your account to buy at least $100 of Bitcoin or Ethereum. Then sell the Bitcoin/Ethereum immediately. You'll receive your $25 in free Bitcoin bonus and can transfer the money back to your bank.
Voyager App offers commission-free cryptocurrency trading for over 20 cryptos and its currently available to residents in all U.S. states (excluding New York state).
Plus, you can earn monthly interest on your crypto holdings up to 9% APY interest annually on Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, USDC, and USDT!
Please use my referral code by downloading the iOS app or Android app and use reward/referral code O6E5JJ during registration. Its an easy way to earn a $25 worth of free Bitcoin after you buy $100 or more in crypto and cash out the profit back to your bank!
Thank you!

Celsius Network ($120 in Free Bitcoin + Up to 22% APY Interest)

Sign up on Celsius Network (https://celsiusnetwork.app.link/1891962be1) and you'll get $20 in free Bitcoin (BTC) after first deposit of $200 or more in crypto (like Bitcoin, Ripple, Ethereum, USDT, USDC) within 30 days! Just complete the registration and KYC process to earn your free Bitcoin after qualifying deposit!
Plus there is an additional October promotion (see below) to receive an additional $50 or $100 in free Bitcoin/Celsius when you apply for a new loan as low as $500 by 31 October 2020.
You'll also earn up to 22% APY interest on all the cryptos you deposit including BTC, ETH, BCH, LTC, XRP, XLM, Tether Gold, and USD stablecoin (like USDC, USDT, DAI, PAX) with no fees to deposit or withdrawal!
I love Celsius because interest is paid out every Monday! Your free Bitcoin is locked for 30 days after your initial deposit and available to withdrawal after 30 days. You cannot withdraw any funds deposited for 30 days or else you will lose the Bitcoin bonus!
Here's the process to claim your free $120 in Bitcoin/Celsius bonuses:
  1. Sign up for Celsius Network at https://celsiusnetwork.app.link/1891962be1 (or use promo code 1891962be1 during registration at https://celsius.network/ to secure the Bitcoin bonus)
  2. Complete the KYC process including ID verification
  3. Deposit $200 or more in crypto to receive your $20 in free Bitcoin bonus like Bitcoin, Ethereum and USD stablecoin. Bitcoin bonus is locked for 30 days after qualifying deposit and after 30 days you can keep or withdraw it. DO NOT WITHDRAW any crypto from your account during the 30 days after qualifying deposit OR YOU WILL LOSE the bonus. Wait until the bonus is unlocked.
  4. To earn an extra $50 or $100 in free Bitcoin/Celsius for a new loan, go to 'Profile' -> 'Enter a promo code'. Enter the promo code TREAT then apply for a new loan via the app by Saturday 31 October 2020.
  5. You'll receive $50 in free Bitcoin/Celsius if you borrow less than $3000 and you'll receive $100 in free Bitcoin/Celsius if you borrow $3000 or more. The bonus will be deposit by Sunday 15 November 2020. For more information regarding the loan bonus, check out here.
At the moment you can't link a bank account to deposit cash to your Celsius Network account so you'll need to use Coinbase, Binance US, Crypto.com or Gemini to buy crypto like Bitcoin or USDC and transfer to your Celsius account. Then transfer back to cash out and back to your bank.
Remember to use my Celsius Network referral link - https://celsiusnetwork.app.link/1891962be1 or use promo code 1891962be1 during registration.
In summary, you will earn a total of $20 in free Bitcoin after depositing at least $200+ in crypto into your Celsius Network account within 30 days plus another $50 or $100 in Bitcoin/Celsius if you apply for a loan.
If you want to buy more CEL token (Celsius Network token) to earn higher interest on your crypto deposits, signup for Liquid crypto trading platform to buy or sell and earn 10% back on all trading fees - https://www.liquid.com/sign-up/?affiliate=InZmUQNE727430
Thank you!

BlockFi ($10 in Free Bitcoin + Earn up to 8.6% Per Year on Crypto Deposits)

Sign up for BlockFi (https://blockfi.com/?ref=c316afd8) and receive $10 in free Bitcoin bonus when you deposit $100 or more in crypto and maintain the qualifying balance until the following interest payment day. The bonus is deposited on your first monthly interest payment. Do not withdraw from your balance or you WILL LOSE the Bitcoin bonus payment. Just wait until you receive your Bitcoin bonus then you can withdraw from your account.
This promotional $10 Bitcoin bonus is available to all customers globally!
Plus you'll earn up to 8.6% per year on the cryptos you deposit into your BlockFi account like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, PAX, GUSD and USDC. Interest is compounded monthly and paid out on the 1st of every month.
You can download the iOS app (https://apps.apple.com/us/app/blockfi/id1506274532) or Android app (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.blockfi.mobile). Be sure to use referral code c316afd8 during signup to get your $10 Bitcoin bonus after initial $100 or more deposit.
BlockFi supports bank wire transfers and deposits via crypto. If you want to buy crypto and deposit on BlockFi, you will need to use Coinbase, Gemini, Crypto.com or Binance to link your bank account to buy crypto and transfer to BlockFi.
In addition to earning interest on your crypto deposits, BlockFi allows you to exchange cryptos like BTC for Ethereum and take out a loan without selling your crypto.
BlockFi is available to all customers globally including in all 50 US states! BlockFi is a licensed and regulated company in the United States.
Remember to sign up at https://blockfi.com/?ref=c316afd8 to get your $10 in free Bitcoin bonus.
Thank you!

Gemini ($10 in Free Bitcoin)

Get $10 in free Bitcoin when you signup for Gemini, a US-based regulated and licensed cryptocurrency exchange. This offer is available to NEW USERS ONLY residing in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Hong Kong, Singapore, and South Korea.
Follow these steps:
  1. Sign up for a Gemini account with my referral link at https://gemini.com/share/mllyldt7 (new users only)
  2. Verify your identity
  3. Link your bank account and deposit $100 or more
  4. Buy or Sell 100 USD of any crypto within 30 days of opening an account and Gemini will deposit your bonus of $10 worth of Bitcoin within a day.
After you receive your free $10 of Bitcoin, you can sell your cryptos and transfer the cash back to your bank! Gemini also allows you to transfer any crypto to an external wallet for free with no withdrawal fees.
Gemini is regulated by the New York State Department of Financial Services (NYSDFS) and was founded in 2014 by Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss.
Thank you!

Coinbase ($10 in Free Bitcoin + $171 in Bonus Crypto)

Sign up for a Coinbase cryptocurrency account (https://www.coinbase.com/join/5a29d6adad50d7010b47bac0) and get $10 of free Bitcoin (BTC) after you buy or sell $100 or more in cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Bitcoin Cash. You will also need to verify your identity. This offer is available to all customers globally!
In addition, visit Coinbase Earn (https://coinbase.com/earn/comp/invite/fqns7918) and get up to $171 in free cryptocurrency by learning, watching videos, and answering simple questions about other cryptocurrencies like EOS (up to $50 bonus), Stellar Lumens (up to $50 bonus), and Compound (up to $59 bonus) without any deposit or trading required. You can easily make up to $160 in free cryptocurrency and cash out the money back to your bank!
You can also earn 0.15% annual interest holding USDC tokens (for US customers) and 4% annual interest staking Tezos tokens (for US, UK, and EU customers)!
Coinbase is one of the most trusted and easiest place to buy, sell, and manage your digital currency portfolio and its available in 100+ countries around the world! Coinbase allows you to deposit/withdrawal funds via free bank transfer, credit/debit card or bank wire.
Remember to use my referral link to get your $10 of free Bitcoin after trading $100 or more in crypto plus another $115 in free crypto bonuses - https://www.coinbase.com/join/5a29d6adad50d7010b47bac0
Thank you!

Liquid (Earn 10% Back + 50% Discount on All Crypto Trades)

Sign up for Liquid (https://www.liquid.com/sign-up/?affiliate=InZmUQNE727430), the world's most comprehensive and secure cryptocurrency trading platform, and earn 10% back on all trading fees paid on your cryptocurrency trades like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, XRP, and Alt Coins including Celsius (CEL) and Crypterium (CRPT) tokens. Plus receive a 50% trading fee discount by paying in Qash tokens. Liquid offers trading fees as low as 0%.
Plus you can deposit fiat/cash via bank transfer to your Liquid account in currencies like USD, EUR, SGD, AUD, PHP and HKD.
Liquid is NOT available to users in United States of America and Japan.
To earn 10% back and 50% discount on all crypto trading fees, sign up at https://www.liquid.com/sign-up/?affiliate=InZmUQNE727430 or use referral/promo code InZmUQNE727430 during registration.
If you would like to earn additional signup bonuses with the Celsius (free $20 in Bitcoin after $200+ crypto deposit) and Crypterium (free $5 bonus after $60 or more in crypto trades) wallet apps, visit https://celsiusnetwork.app.link/1891962be1 and https://crypterium.app.link/DU5iX9vsDY
Thank you!

Binance US

Sign up for a free account on Binance.US to buy and sell cryptocurrency and enjoy fees as low as 0.075%! Binance US allows you to connect a bank account and deposit cash directly via ACH deposit for free to buy crypto. Or you can use a debit card to buy crypto.
Please use my referral link https://www.binance.us/?ref=35011786 or use referral ID 35011786 during registration.
Binance.US is only available to US customers and in most states, but not all states on its initial launch. At the moment, Binance.US accounts will NOT be available in the following states: Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Georgia, Vermont, Washington.
Thank you!

Crypterium ($5 Cash Bonus)

Have you tried the Crypterium Crypto Wallet App for iOS and Android? Sign up for Crypterium at https://crypterium.app.link/DU5iX9vsDY (or use referral code cdgy4 during signup) and get a $5 cash bonus by verifying your identity and make a transaction worth €50/$60 or more (like buy or sell crypto) via the Crypterium Wallet app.
Crypterium lets you buy, send, exchange or cash out crypto, and even get the first global crypto card! The Crypterium Wallet is regarded as one of the most promising fintech solutions by KPMG and H2 Ventures. Making crypto as easy to spend as cash!
Plus for a limited time, get a Crypto Loan in USDT from Crypterium for 0% interest for up to 12 months by using Bitcoin or Ethereum as collateral. Get approved in as little as 30 seconds without credit checks!
The Crypterium App supports cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Bitcoin Cash, CRPT, XRP, LINK, MKR, QASH, BAT, ZRX, REP, OMG, USDC, USDT, DAI, and EURS.
Register at https://crypterium.app.link/DU5iX9vsDY to receive a link to download the app or use my referral code cdgy4 during signup at https://crypterium.com and get your $5 cash bonus!
Thank you!

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